to be in port at the Port of Pittsford
on the weekend of August 25-26.

(Click on each title for more info)

 
Glassmaking innovations in Corning have shaped the modern world, from the first electric light bulbs for Thomas Edison and the invention of optical fiber for tele-communications, to the glass used in modern flat screen displays. And that story all began with a voyage on New York State’s waterways.

In 1868, the Brooklyn Flint Glass Company relocated to Corning, via the New York Waterways, and evolved into the company that is today known as Corning Incorporated. In celebration of the 150th anniversary of this pivotal journey, CMoG will launch GlassBarge—a 30’ x 80’ canal barge equipped with CMoG’s patented all-electric glassmaking equipment—in Brooklyn Bridge Park on May 17, 2018.

It will then travel north on the Hudson, then westward along the Erie Canal before making its way to the Finger Lakes. It will stop at ports in Yonkers, Poughkeepsie, Kingston, Albany, Little Falls, Sylvan Beach, Baldwinsville, Fairport, Lockport, Buffalo, Medina, Brockport, Pittsford, Seneca Falls, and Watkins Glen. A ceremonial last leg of the trip will take place by land, concluding in Corning with a community-wide celebration on September 22.

In addition to sharing the story of glassmaking in Corning, the GlassBarge tour emphasizes the continued role of New York’s waterways in shaping the state’s industry, culture, and community. GlassBarge is the 2018 signature event for the statewide celebration of the Erie Canal Bicentennial.

The GlassBarge journey will also be celebrated back in Corning with a re-installation of the Crystal City Gallery, which shares the story of how Corning became one of the premier centers for glass cutting in the United States.

For more information email:
glassbarge@cmog.org

  The schooner Lois McClure is a full-scale replica of an 1862-class sailing canal boat, constructed in Burlington, Vermont. The schooner is named in honor of Lois McClure, who, along with her husband Mac, has been a major contributor to this and many other worthy community projects in the greater Burlington, VT area.

In 1823, the Northern Canal connecting Lake Champlain to the Hudson River was completed. The lake, which since the end of the American Revolution had been an expanding commercial highway, now virtually exploded in trade. Along with the traditionally designed sloops, schooners and the recently invented steamboats the lake now witnessed the birth of a watercraft new to North America; the sailing-canal boat.

The Lake Champlain sailing-canal boat was built as an "experiment" and designed to be able to sail from distant lake ports to the canal on the power of the wind. Upon reaching the canal, the masts were lowered and centerboard raised and the now transformed vessel could directly enter the canal. The first editions of the craft, dubbed the "1823" class, were characterized by the randomness of their design. By 1841 the design had been standardized and the "1841" class were just under 80 feet in length and roughly 13 feet in beam, so that they could fit the locks and canal prism of that period. By 1862, the expansion of the canal allowed for an expansion of design and the "1862" class was developed. This new vessel was roughly 88 feet in length and 14 feet in beam, with a slightly deeper depth of hold.

Two shipwrecks in particular were studied for the creation of our replica Lois McClure, both located in Burlington Harbor, Vermont. For the detailed story on these wrecks, follow the links to the OJ Walker, and General Butler. Now these shipwrecks are part of the Lake Champlain Underwater Historic Preserve System, accessible by any SCUBA diver.

For more information: call (802) 475-2022

PARTNERS
GlassBarge is enabled through the generous support of grants from I LOVE NEW YORK, Empire State Development’s Division of Tourism; the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA); and the New York State Canal Corporation through Governor Andrew Cuomo’s Regional Economic Development Council Initiative.   The Lake Champlain Maritime Museum will invite people aboard the Lois McClure to learn about what life was like on board a canal barge in the 19th century. Tours are first come, first served and do not require registration. The South Street Seaport Museum will also be on hand to talk about their historic tug that will be moving GlassBarge along the waterways.